Byesville Rotary

Meeting time: Tuesday 7:30 am--8:30 am.

Location: Stop Nine Senior Center at 60313 (GPS use 60299) Southgate Road, Byesville .

Club officers 2014-2015:

President--Chuck Fair

President Elect/Vice President--Shana Fair

Treasurer--Phyliss Jeffries

Secretary--Joe Waske

Master at Arms--Larry Miller

Member Chair--Jim Vaughan

Board members:
Jim Vaughan--term ends June 2015
Nellie Bichard--term ends June 2016
Tina Tonnous--term ends June 2017

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Byesville Rotary learns local agencies implementing new method to tackle drug and alcohol problems



Pictured: Karen Wiggens, incoming Executive Director Alcohol and Drug Services of Guernsey County; Linda Secrest, retiring Executive Director, and Chuck Fair; Byesville Rotary President.


Drug and alcohol related problems and crime have been increasing in Guernsey County. To deal with these problems, Alcohol and Drug Services of Guernsey County is partnering with Six Counties Mental Health and the Probation Department for Municipal Court.

These agencies are developing a program designed to reduce crime and other problems related to drug and alcohol abuse. Linda Secrest, retiring Executive Director of Alcohol and Drug Services of Guernsey County, and Karen Wiggens, incoming Executive Director, spoke to the Rotary about the new program.

The program will provide intensive supervised probation to individuals meeting specific qualifications. Non-violent, chemically-dependent offenders and people who have a high likelihood of becoming dependent will be given the opportunity to develop the tools and life skills they will need to live a drug and/or alcohol free life.

The program will be initiated by the judge of the Common Pleas Drug Court who will have the option of offering this program to specific types of offenders. If a person was arrested, the arrest must be for a non-violent crime. The offender must agree to go to Drug Court, wear an ankle bracelet, be randomly drug tested, and avoid bars or other places identified as dangerous.

In phase 1 of the program, the offender will be under intensive supervision every day for 30 days. They will be mentored by a Narcotics or Alcoholics Anonymous mentor, see a counselor every week, and attend weekly group counseling sessions. Anyone failing to meet these requirements will go back to jail. More significantly, they will lose an opportunity to turn around their lives.

In phase 2, supervision will be reduced. After a year, the offender’s case and the results of his or her efforts to comply with the recovery program will be evaluated. Depending on results, the offender’s sentence could be reduced and/or removed from his/her record.

The program is proactive. Drug and alcohol related problems will be identified early and steps will be taken to prevent problems from reoccurring or become more serious. Similar programs in other cities have proven to be cost effective. Secrest pointed out that, “…$3.00 are saved for every dollar invested in a drug court and $5600-$6208 is saved for every person who is not rearrested for a drug or alcohol related crime.”
The speakers for the September 23 meeting will be representatives from the Kennedy Stone House.

Connect with Byesville Rotary at: www.Byesvillerotary.blogspot.com or https://www.facebook.com/pages/Byesville-Rotary/256548047818283. The club meets 7:30 am, Tuesday at the Stop Nine Senior Center at 60313 (GPS use 60299) Southgate Road, Byesville. Call Membership Chair Jim Vaughan, 740-432-5605, to learn more about how to join.

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Byesville Rotary gets short class in funeral planning


Pictured: Trent Black, Funeral Director, Black-Epperson Funeral Home, and Chuck Fair; President.


Trent Black, Funeral Director at Black-Epperson Funeral Home in Byesville, explained that funeral planning requires many choices. Family members, grieving over the loss of a loved one, often find that making these choices is difficult. Many people choose to preplan their own funerals in order to spare their family the stress. The preplanning process also gives family members the opportunity to share their ideas about what they want for a funeral.

Black stated that the most common questions include how much a funeral will cost, how people pay for a funeral, and what options are available. Costs can vary widely depending on the options chosen. Planners begin by deciding if they want burial or cremation. Decisions need to be made about where the service is to be held—at home, church, or the funeral home. Are flowers wanted or donations to a favorite charity preferred. Every funeral can be customized to meet the needs of the individual and the family.

Individuals can decide to have a “green” funeral. Black said that in a “green” funeral a biodegradable casket is used. The casket is not encased in a vault and no embalming is done. However, “green” funerals are permitted only on family owned property, and the grave site or family cemetery must be indicated on the deed.

Black pointed out that cremation is becoming more and more popular. When he started as a funeral director, about 10% of his clients asked for cremation. Today, cremation in the USA has risen to 45%. Cremation costs vary widely in the US. In Nevada, 75% of funerals are cremations.
In Ohio, only 30% chose cremation. Black thinks that the trend toward cremation may be influenced by the relative costs of cremation. A basic cremation is $1000. With extras the cost can rise to about $4500. In comparison, the cost of a traditional funeral averages $8300 which covers casket, minister, obituary, flowers, etc.

Black has been in the funeral business for 25 years. In order to qualify as a funeral director he had to have 2 years of college followed by two years of study at the Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science. He then served a one year apprenticeship. Before he could practice on his own, he had to pass the state examination for an embalmer’s license.

The speaker for the September 16 meeting will be a representative from Alcohol and Drug Services of Guernsey County who will speak about the new HOPE program.

Connect with Byesville Rotary at: www.Byesvillerotary.blogspot.com or https://www.facebook.com/pages/Byesville-Rotary/256548047818283. The club meets 7:30 am, Tuesday at the Stop Nine Senior Center at 60313 (GPS use 60299) Southgate Road, Byesville. Call Membership Chair Jim Vaughan, 740-432-5605, to learn more about how to join.

Monday, September 8, 2014

Byesville Rotary learns NRO works 24/7 to protect nation



Pictured: Oziel Jeffries, Speaker Host; Major J. Russ Jeffries; and Chuck Fair; President.
 

Major J. Russ Jeffries spoke to the Byesville Rotary about his job in the National Reconnaissance Organization (NRO). A naval officer, Major Jeffries recently retired after 23 years of service in the Navy. He began his naval career 23 years ago as an intelligence analyst. At his retirement on August 15, he was serving as Chief Engineer for Signals Intelligence Systems Acquisition.

NRO stands for National Reconnaissance Organization. Maj. Jeffries explained that his job was to insure that the United States had eyes and ears in space. He was involved in designing and building equipment that was both durable and redundant as well as cutting edge. He explained that there have many changes in reconnaissance methods in the years he has served. Early on high altitude planes and cameras loaded with film were used. Unfortunately, even very high altitude planes can be identified and eliminated.

The next step was into space. Satellites were developed to collect data. Film was used to record the information. The film had to be returned to earth where it was captured in mid-air by a plane. Maj. Jeffries pointed out that evaluating film took weeks. Once the NRO began capturing information digitally, evaluation of the data became faster and more timely. Maj. Jeffries explained that today ground troops and pilots can be immediately linked with data streamed from a satellite.

Maj. Jeffries stated that the war on terror requires new thinking and new ways of collecting data so that the US can track lower signature targets such as small groups working under cover of forests or towns. This type of group is more difficult to track than armies which are accompanied with large pieces of equipment and supply lines.

Maj. Jeffries recommended that a young person wanting an exciting and challenging job needs to prepare him-/herself by taking science and business courses. His/her goal should be to get a degree in at least one of the hard sciences such as chemistry, physics mechanical, chemical, aero- or astro- engineering or a business degree.

Connect with Byesville Rotary at: www.Byesvillerotary.blogspot.com or https://www.facebook.com/pages/Byesville-Rotary/256548047818283. The club meets 7:30 am, Tuesday at the Stop Nine Senior Center at 60313 (GPS use 60299) Southgate Road, Byesville. Call Membership Chair Jim Vaughan, 740-432-5605, to learn more about how to join.



Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Byesville Rotary introduced to HARP





Pictured: Jim Vaughan, speaker Chair; Tammy Schultheisz, Director HARP Mission; and Chuck Fair, President.


Tammy Schultheisz, Director of the HARP Mission located in Caldwell, explained that HARP stands for “Helping Appalachian Rural People.” HARP is a non-profit, faith-based organization with ties to the Lutheran Church. The organization serves all of Ohio but the biggest percentage of people who are helped live in Guernsey, Washington and Noble Counties.

Schultheisz stated that HARP focuses on providing assistance in disaster relief for victims of home fires, floods and storm damage. HARP has expanded their efforts to include families and individuals who are low income, disabled, veterans, or elderly. The goal of the organization is to help people get settled in safe and sanitary, temporary housing while their homes are repaired. This effort includes helping to restore homes and providing people with large household items such as furniture for bedrooms and living rooms as well as appliances for the kitchen and laundry.

Schultheisz explained that her organization depends on donations of all types to meet their goals of their mission. Donations can be cash, volunteered time, or 8?/gently used furniture and appliances.

Currently, Schultheisz has 236 clients with varying needs, Forty-six need appliances of some type. Refrigerators are the appliance most frequently needed. She also has 16 small construction or repair projects such as repairing a leaky roof, installing a shower or yard work waiting for volunteers to be completed. Three of these projects are wheelchair ramps that need to be built for clients living in Byesville.

In order to meet needs of clients, Schultheisz is developing partnership with local churches and other agencies in the region. Her goal for the coming year is to develop partnerships with at least 150 new churches and businesses. Schultheisz invites people who would like to become involved with HARP to contact her at 740-365-0052 or tammy@harpmission.org.

Chuck Fair and Jim Vaughan presented the club’s newest member, Melinda Yearin who works for Howell-Craig Insurance in Cumberland, to the club members.

The speaker for the September 2 meeting will be Major Jonathon Jeffries. His topic will be the National Reconnaissance Organization.

Connect with Byesville Rotary at: www.Byesvillerotary.blogspot.com or https://www.facebook.com/pages/Byesville-Rotary/256548047818283. The club meets 7:30 am, Tuesday at the Stop Nine Senior Center at 60313 (GPS use 60299) Southgate Road, Byesville.. Call Membership Chair Jim Vaughan, 740-432-5605, to learn more about how to join.